E.g., 08/25/2016
E.g., 08/25/2016

Marissa Esthimer

Experts & Staff

Marissa Esthimer

Communications and Web Specialist

Marissa Esthimer is Communications and Web Specialist at the Migration Policy Institute, where she works on publication design and production, dissemination of the Institute’s research, website operations, and monitoring of the Institute's media mentions.

Ms. Esthimer has also worked as a pro bono online media consultant for a nonprofit that aims to provide job training for Latinos in the DC metro area. Previously, she interned at the Center for International Policy and the Center for Democracy in the Americas, where her work focused on U.S. relations with Latin America. She spent a semester studying in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Ms. Esthimer graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor's degree in anthropology and government and a minor in international relations.

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Signed more than 30 years ago, the Cartagena Declaration sought to address rising flows of refugees and establish regional solidarity in refugee protection in Latin America. This article explores the evolution of refugee and asylum policies in Latin America amid the long-running Colombian civil war, as well as the region's response to the current global refugee crisis.

Facing electoral challenges, falling approval rates, and weak economies, some political leaders in 2015 altered border policies or engaged in conflicts across borders as tools of domestic policy. This trend looks at the effects on migration of conflicts between Venezuela and Colombia, Russia and Ukraine, and India and Nepal.

The number of people around the world forcibly displaced by conflict or persecution reached its highest total since World War II, with more than 51.2 million fleeing their country or displaced within it, the UN refugee agency reported in 2014. An estimated 13.6 million people have been displaced by conflicts in Syria and Iraq alone, constituting what the UN High Commissioner for Refugees dubbed a mega-crisis.